Discovering Christian Blogging: Blogger Aaron Armstrong

Series Introduction:
Christian Blogging is not only popular but it is also a profession. Blogs as a medium are a valuable resource to receive spiritual edification, news, popular commentary on current events through a Christian lens, and insight to finding valuable resources (books, music, et al.) at discounted prices. Blogs essentially are a wonderful learning environment accessed at a reader’s leisure.

Yet, many Christians are not aware of this valuable resource. Not only this but they are not familiar with who to follow on platforms such as Twitter or to subscribe to via e-mail or their RSS Reader like Feedly.

The purpose of this series is to identify and interview exceptional Christian Bloggers in order to introduce people to their blogging ministry. I hope you enjoy this series. We will continue it throughout the summer, so please stay tuned. You’re going to meet some markedly gifted people who have a passion to share God’s truth and God’s gospel through this unique digital platform.

Obviously, for this series to be successful I need your help. Please share with others about this series. I’m just preaching to the choir if regular blog readers catch on to this series. Tell your friends about this series by word of mouth. Help them create a twitter account or have a feedly RSS reader account. And yes! Retweet. Like. Subscribe. Share. Help others discover this digital treasure trove of bloggers who serve the Church via this medium.

These interviews will post each Thursday during the coming weeks. We’ve already got an excellent lineup of bloggers who are participating in the series. Below is the current schedule, which we will be updating as the queue of bloggers develops.

Discovering Christian Bloggers Interview Schedule:
May 9 – Aaron Armstrong
May 16 – Trevin Wax
May 23 – Stephen Altrogge
May 30 – Mike Leake
June 6 – Gloria Furman

Today’s Featured Blogger:Aaron Armstong Pic

Aaron Armstrong is the author of Contend: Defending the Faith in a Fallen World and Awaiting a Savior: The Gospel, the New Creation, and the End of Poverty. He is a writer for an international Christian ministry, serves as an itinerant preacher throughout southern Ontario, and blogs daily at Blogging Theologically.

1. What is your website/blog url? What would you describe as being the profile of your blog? What Christian niche do you best serve?

My blog is bloggingtheologically.com. I spend a lot of time addressing contemporary theological issues, writing book reviews and encouraging readers to dig into books written by “dead mentors.” The readership tends to skew toward the TGC/Young-Restless-Reformed crowd.

2. How did your blogging ministry begin?

It started out of desperation. I’d accidentally become a staff writer in my day job with no experience and I needed to figure out how to do it—fast. So, I started the blog as a way to practice writing regularly.

At the same time, I was also reading a LOT of books, but had no outlet for processing my thoughts on any of them and working out my doctrinal convictions. The blog allowed me to do this and still does, which is really nice.

3. What is the most meaningful post you have written and why?

You had to ask a hard question, didn’t you? :)

I’m not sure about an all-time most meaningful post, but I can definitely share a couple from the last year that I felt were particularly meaningful to me.

One shared the lessons my wife and I learned while looking back on life after home ownership (http://www.bloggingtheologically.com/2012/08/30/life-after-home-ownership/). The journey from deciding to sell to finally putting up the sold sign was fairly intense for us, emotionally and spiritually, and God was so faithful to us through it and afterwards.

A second would definitely be the article I wrote on why it’s sometimes better to stop following “celebrity” pastors (http://www.bloggingtheologically.com/2012/02/15/why-i-quit-following-most-celebrity-pastors-on-twitter-and-maybe-you-should-too/). If there’s one growing danger to any of us in any form of public ministry, it’s our culture’s sick obsession with deifying humans. We Christians are as guilty of it as anyone. We too often put our favorite pastors and authors on a pedestal and give them a burden they were never meant to bear. The more humble (and who have consistent, strong accountability structures in place) tend to weather it better, but too many start believing their own press and destroying their ministries.

More recently, a post I wrote to my fellow Canadians in light of a recent Supreme Court ruling on hate speech (http://www.bloggingtheologically.com/2013/03/07/how-can-christians-maintain-a-faithful-witness-in-canada/). We’re in a really interesting time where we are gradually seeing the values of first century Rome assert themselves. Homosexuality was an accepted practice, sexual promiscuity was a given, infanticide was committed without the bat of an eye… This piece was written to remind us that being witnesses for Christ in that kind of culture has consequences, but there’s great hope for us as we carry out our calling.

4. What is the most popular post that you have written? Why do you think it gained such extensive readership?

By far, the most popular post on the site is one I wrote on the cliché, “God won’t give you more than you can handle.” (http://www.bloggingtheologically.com/2009/07/20/everyday-theology-god-wont-give-you-more-than-you-can-handle/). It’s been read about four times more than its nearest competition.

Thousands of people are Googling this phrase every week—they want to know if it’s true, if the Bible actually says anything remotely close to this. Looking at our culture, people are clearly carrying burdens far heavier than they were ever meant to bear—and to say that “God won’t give you more than you can handle” while someone is being completely crushed is the cruelest thing we can do. Instead, we need to point them to the One who carries the burden for us.

5. What has been you inspiration to write? Why have you been inspired to write?

I write because I want to see others grow in their faith; I really want to take Scripture’s charge to equip and encourage one another seriously. And this works both ways—when I hear that a part of a book I wrote or one of my articles on the blog are helpful or were encouraging, I’m encouraged too. It’s a really nice thing to see and I’m grateful to God for the opportunities He’s provided through it.